<Insert Clever Library Porn Story Name Here>

From the NY Post:

Shakespeare’s plays, Einstein’s theories — and porn queen Jenna Jameson’s steamy online sexcapades.

New Yorkers can take their pick at the city’s public libraries, thanks to a policy that gives adults the most uncensored access to extreme, hard-core Internet smut this side of the old Times Square.

The electronic smut falls under the heading of free speech and the protection of the First Amendment, library officials say.

The article goes on in the typical porn-in-the-library Mad Libs manner: ordinary citizens outraged at the very idea while library officials offer stale free speech and First Amendment snippets. The only issue I can see is the poor timing for New York City library advocacy efforts as they combat cuts to their systems. It take the steam out of all the efforts to highlight all of the good things that the public libraries do for their community and focuses it on a tiny minority of computer users. It’s rather unfortunate, really, and I hope this issue fizzles in the media.

4 thoughts on “<Insert Clever Library Porn Story Name Here>

  1. You know, I have never understood this whole issue.

    First of all, my opinion is that viewing porn on a public access computer is as appropriate as walking in the front door and dropping your pants. Yes, you may have the right to view it. However, we have the right to not see the crap you’re viewing.

    Most libraries don’t have pornography in their library collections. Why is viewing inappropriate material acceptable when it’s in digital form?

  2. Pingback: Again??? | Impromptu Librarian

  3. Mary Beth, most libraries don’t have porn because it is not part of their collection policy (which is usually created the community in mind). The Internet is something different. A library is basically providing access to an information portal by providing Internet access. Should a library filter this access? What is an acceptable definition of porn? Usually, library policy is free speech, no filter, but if patrons complains, ask the offending user to stop. As Andy said, it is usually just a few users and not that big of a problem. Unfortunate that the NY Post decided to make a story out of it. And not even a very good one.

  4. If I hadn’t noticed and moved fast, my three-year-old son would have been exposed to pornography someone was looking at on a public library computer right by the exit door. I was in shock when I realized what I was seeing– all I could manage was to push my child out the door. By the time we reached the car, I realized I had to go back and alert the librarian– a kids’ program was about to let out! Displaying pornography to a child is included in the definition of sexual abuse.

Share your thoughts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s