Library Word of the Year

I did a quick #andypoll today and asked people what they thought the Library Word of the Year should be. I collected all the results, put them into Inkscape, and made my own Wordle out of the results. (Thanks to Bradley Shipps for the Wordle idea!)

On that note, I’m going back into blogging hibernation. See people in the new year!

#andypoll–12/10/10

On Twitter today, I posted an #andypoll that asked: “Invent a new library word, provide a definition, & use it in a sentence. GO! RT plz!” I didn’t get many replies, but I loved the ones I got so much that I wanted to post them. So, here they are:

  • libraderie: Friendship and goodwill between librarians. “Little makes me happier than the libraderie I have with my colleagues.” (by @gingeringeorgia)
  • Lamenter: A person who constantly complains. “He got fired because he’s a lamenter.” (by @uberlibrarygirl)
  • Transvesselify – to provide timely information in the format (or vessel) most appropriate to the user. "This resource is going to be extremely popular – we need to transvesselify to cater for old and new markets." or "Traditionally that book has always been popular in print, but we need to transvesselify." (by @theREALwikiman)
  • Inforationale: helping students learn the rationale of good information seeking skills. (by @dianekauppi)
  • Virtuarefassist: where students get virtual ref to do their homework. "I used virutarefassist to find the answers." (by @andi33079)
  • e-new: to renew electronic resources from outside the library. “I’m e-newing ‘The Lost City of Z’, excellent!” (by @LibraryCynthia)
  • Smold. The smell of a closed study room during finals. “Even after two days, the smold in room 214 was tangible. Next year we hand out Febreze.” (by @bmljenny)

If anyone wants to add their own word, use the comments to add your own perfectly cromulent word. It embiggens our professional vocabulary!

#andypoll – 10/12/10

So, I sent out a Tweet this morning that simply asked this:

#andypoll: So, what library issue is on your mind today?

And I got a tremendous response from Twitter. I have taken screenshots of the replies with the #andypoll hashtag and made one giant image. (I don’t think I made it big enough, but as someone who doesn’t need glasses, I can still read it.)

Click to embiggen

I was going to write about what I see in this jungle of replies, but first I want to know what do YOU see in these tweets? I’ll share my thoughts tomorrow.

Leave a comment with your observations and thoughts or if there is something in particular that caught your attention.

The People Business

I’ve been running the near daily #andypoll on Twitter for a couple of months now. Sometimes the questions are goofy, sometimes they are serious, and most of the time they are just random questions that pop into my head. The question I asked today elicited all sorts of answers.

You should add your own answer below.

For this particular poll, I got a ton of answers. So many, in fact, that rather than highlight a few, I compiled them into a giant picture file.

Click to embiggen

They certainly represent a broad spectrum of views and beliefs as to what makes a librarian a librarian. If I was to generalize them, they hover around customer service skills (e.g. empathy, patience, kindness, and a love of people, to name a few).

But I was curious as to what non-librarians thought would be a quality that they would look for in librarians. So I (and a few other people) asked around. Again, I compiled it into a graphic (albeit a smaller one).

Click to embiggenWhile this does not meet any sort of scientific credibility at a glance, I thought even in the few answers collected that they lined up some of the answers given by my fellow professionals on Twitter. Moreover, it was a confirmation of the personal aspect of the service; that attitude and approachability have a higher importance to non-librarian library users than other proficiencies and knowledges.

While this isn’t a Will Manley poll, it certainly something to get conversations started. What do you think is the #1 quality a librarian or library staff member should have?