Defend the Freedom to Read: It’s Everybody’s Job

“Defend the Right to Read: It’s Everybody’s Job” THE VIDEO

“Defend the Right to Read: It’s Everybody’s Job” is an awareness campaign I’ve been working on with the ALA Office of Intellectual Freedom (OIF) for the past couple of months. It was born out of learning about the dismal estimate that only one in four book challenges or removals are reported to the OIF. One in four! I knew I wanted to do something about it so I pitched this idea to the OIF. It’s been a long process, but I’m proud to see this campaign finally come to fruition. It was inspired by the World War II “we can do this together!” posters and the New York Transit System “If you see something, say something” campaign. This is, as the tagline above plainly puts it, everybody’s job and it needs your help.

In collaborating for this awareness campaign, I am hoping that it will encourage people to come forward and report book challenges or removals. I believe there are a number of excellent benefits to better reporting of book challenges/removals.

First and foremost, better data means better analysis. This means the ability to look at these events and spot trends and patterns. If there is a school book that is being routinely moved up from a younger grade to an older one, there is value in the ability to alert school librarians to that situation. It might also warrant a re-evaluation of the material to ensure that it is in the proper location or grade. If there is an individual or group challenging a book in a particular part of a state or region, there is value in advising libraries in the immediate area to such activity. This allows for librarians not to be taken by surprise and to prepare for the possibility. If a book appears to be targeted because it is by a particular author or appears on a list, there is value in making that connection and informing the membership. While it may not be local to one area of the country or another, such a discovery won’t happen without the challenges being reported. Or, to put it in the immortal words of Lester Freamon in The Wire, “All the pieces matter.”

Second, reporting can be done anonymously and the challenge files are held in confidence. This is not a campaign to draft people into this battle, but to gather intelligence. With these kinds of safeguards, people can still take action while minimizing their exposure to repercussions. Simply put, it’s doing something rather than doing nothing and that can make all the difference.

Last but not least, librarians are the public defenders of literature and prose. As such, we do not have the luxury of choosing our clientele. In a nation which values ideas and expression, every book deserves and demands a vigorous defense. It is the right and proper thing to do even in the face of mounting adversity and focused opposition. Though some may consider this an unpopular burden upon the profession, I believe that it is our honored duty. It is who we proclaim ourselves to be: offering the greatest possible access to literature and information to all who seek it. Let us embrace this ideal and act accordingly.

***

The art is available via download from the ALA OIF site. There are blog banners, social media avatar, print posters, and wallpapers. Grab one for your social media stuff and show your support! We need to spread the word! You can bug OIF for the bookmark file (there was one, I believe); you can also bug them if you want to request this graphic in poster or t-shirt form.

I made a video for this campaign which I hope you will enjoy. The books and the lyrics are matched according to my quirky system; some are obvious, some are not, and I hope you enjoy figuring them out. Be sure to share it to see what other people think of it!

[The wonderful Amy Houser did the art for this project. If you are working at a library or a library system that is considering branding illustrations, I highly recommend her art skills and creative talents. Tell her Andy sent you! –A]

5 thoughts on “Defend the Freedom to Read: It’s Everybody’s Job

  1. You don’t have the freedom to read in public schools where it violates Board of Education v. Pico: http://laws.findlaw.com/us/457/853.html

    You don’t have the right to read where it violates school selection policy: http://safelibraries.blogspot.com/2011/09/marking-25-years-of-banned-books-week.html

    Most people oppose explicit books in public schools: http://tinyurl.com/MostOpposeExplicitBooks

    Include those sources (possibly replacing the Harris Poll direct link for mine) in your new campaign and you’ll get the thumbs up from me. Andy, I already like you used the word “challenge” instead of the loaded word “ban.”

    Hot tip, I tried http://ala.com/challengereporting as appears in the video and I got a 404 error.

  2. I see. It says ala.com in the video but it’s ala.org in reality. When I try that, it works. This comment is intended to help and is not a complaint.

    It appears from the challenge form that this is Bryan Campbell’s effort to improve reporting. Nice work, Bryan. Hopefully the data will be made available to the public, unlike previously.

  3. Pingback: OIF Blog » First Amendment Rodeo 10/5-10/18, 2011

  4. Pingback: First Amendment Rodeo 10/5-10/18, 2011 | Wild Iris Books | Gainesville, Florida | A New Age Feminist & Metaphysical Store

  5. Pingback: Andy Woodworth …In Six | INALJ (I Need a Library Job)

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